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Updated Apr. 22, 2021

Want to apply for U.S. Citizenship? In this guide we discuss eligibility requirements, filing fees, Form N-400 and how long does it take to become a U.S. citizen.

Every year, over half a million foreign-born individuals seek to become citizens of the United States.

The process of becoming a U.S. citizen is called naturalization.

Over 90% of foreign-born U.S. citizens were naturalized through their permanent resident (green card) status, by marrying a U.S. citizen, or serving in the military.

This article discusses who is eligible and the naturalization process through Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization) of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS).

Who’s Eligible to Apply for Citizenship?

Every person applying to become a naturalized citizen of the United States must:

Otherwise, depending on the grounds upon which your N-400 application is based, you must meet the following criteria:

 Permanent Resident

As a lawful permanent resident, you may apply for naturalization if:

Married to U.S. Citizen

If you are married to a U.S. citizen, you may apply for naturalization if:

Military Service – More Than One Year

If you are in the U.S. military, you may apply for naturalization if:

Military Service – Less Than One Year or More Than Six Months From Discharge

If you were in the U.S. military, you may apply for naturalization if:

Grounds for Denying Citizenship

While the above-listed criteria are necessary to apply for U.S. citizenship, there are also several grounds that will cause your application to be denied:

Time as a Permanent Resident

The term “Permanent Resident” is foreign-born persons who have lawfully entered and are living in the United States under USCIS Form I-551, also known as a green card.

In most cases, a person seeking naturalization must have been a Permanent Resident for three or five years prior to the date of their N-400 application.

U.S. law makes no exception for this Permanent Resident time period.

Continuous Residence

Being a Permanent Resident for three or five years is not enough.

An N-400 applicant must have maintained a “continuous residence” in the U.S. for the three or five year period.

“Continuous residence” under U.S. law means that you have not traveled outside the United States for six months or more.

If you leave the country for six months or more, you disrupt your “continuous residence” status and risk your opportunity for U.S. citizenship, even if you re-enter the U.S. on a Re-entry Permit.

This continuous residence requirement does not apply to certain types of applicants such as members of the U.S. Armed Forces who were out of the U.S. on active military duty.

Under certain circumstances, if you have been a permanent resident for one year or more and plan on traveling outside the U.S. for one year or more, you may file Form N-470 (Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes) and, if approved, keep your continuous residence status:

Physical Presence in the United States

“Physical presence” means that you physically reside in the United States long enough to be eligible for naturalization.

Physical presence concerns the time you were physically in the U.S. before naturalization, whereas continuous residence concerns the time you lawfully held continuous U.S. residence before naturalization.

Include trips to Mexico and Canada when counting days outside the U.S.

Like in the continuous residence section above, under certain circumstances, if you have been a permanent resident for one year or more and plan on traveling outside the U.S. for one year or more, you may file Form N-470 (Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes) and, if approved, keep your physical presence status.

Time as a Resident in a USCIS District or State

Most people must live in the same state or USCIS district for at least three months prior to filing the N-400 citizenship application.

The USCIS defines a USCIS district as a geographic area covered by a USCIS District Office.

Students may file their naturalization application in either the state or district where their parents reside if claimed as a dependent by their parent’s taxes.

Or, students may file their application in the state or district where they go to school.

This state or district requirement does not apply to persons on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Good Moral Character

Certain crimes may bar you from becoming naturalized.

For example, you can never show good moral character if you were convicted of murder at any time, or any other aggravated offense on or after November 29, 1990.

Other examples of crimes that might show a lack of good moral character include:

Lying during your USCIS interview will also result in being denied based on moral character.

Moreover, if you become a naturalized citizen and it is later discovered that you lied during your interview, your citizenship will be taken away.

Apply for Citizenship – Form N-400

USCIS Form N-400 is used by foreign-born persons seeking to become naturalized citizens of the United States.

The form itself is divided into 18 parts.

It collects basic biographical information to decide whether you meet all eligibility requirements to become naturalized citizens of the United States.

How Much Does it Cost to Apply for Citizenship?

Form N-400 filing fee is $640.

There will also be a biometric fee of $85. The total cost is $725.

If your family’s total income is equal to or below 150% of the U.S. Poverty Guidelines levels, you may be eligible to have all your I-400 and associated biometric fees waived or reduced.

To ask for a waiver, file Form I-912 (Request for Waiver of Fees) with all supporting documentation. To request a reduction in fees, file Form I-942 (Request for Reduced Fees).

How Long Does it Take to Become a U.S. Citizen?

USCIS’s processing time for an N-400 application is about 8 to 14 months.

After filing your N-400 application, you can always check on the status of your case online through the USCIS website here: https://egov.uscis.gov/casestatus/landing.do

Required Documents Checklist

Depending on the grounds upon which you are filing, when filing your N-400 application, you must provide a copy of the following:

Apply for Citizenship – Step-by-Step Overview

After you file Form N-400, the question is, “What’s next?”

N-400 Steps

In most cases, the steps to naturalization will be:

N-400 Interview

During your interview, the USCIS officer will check your identification and place you under oath before asking you about:

Before your interview, study your N-400 application carefully.

Any differences between your interview answers and application answers will raise concerns with your USCIS interviewing officer.

Answer every question in a clear voice and using your best English, because your ability to understand and reply to the USCIS officer is part of the interview.

The Oath

During your naturalization ceremony, you will be required to take an oath of allegiance to the United States. The oath is as follows:

I hereby declare, on oath,

that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all

allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen;

that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic;

that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same;

that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law;

that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law;

that I will perform work of national importance under

civilian direction when required by the law; and

that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion;

so help me God.

Pros and Cons of Applying for Citizenship

Like everything else, there are both pros and cons of becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Some pros include:

Some cons include:

Apply for Citizenship Now

Get immigration attorney review, online application with USCIS and same day filing with SelfLawyer. Start your citizenship application now.

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